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People from all over the world come to Idaho to enjoy mountain and road biking in some of the most pristine and tranquil locations imaginable.  

 

For mountain bikers, Idaho has more than 12,000 miles of single track trails and at least twice that in 4-wheel-drive dirt roads.  

 

For road bikers, the Trail of the Coeur D'Alene's  is a 72-mile paved path that extends from Plummer, Idaho, to Mullan, Idaho. And don't miss the Coeur d'Alene Parkway.  The parkway is part of the nationally famous North Idaho Centennial Trail, a multi-use recreational trail system that meanders for 24 miles from the Idaho/Washington state line.   Several of Idaho state parks are excellent base camps for a road or mountain bike adventure. Those looking for cycling adventure should also check out the Ashton to Tetonia Trail in East Idaho.

In Idaho, you can support your sport by purchasing an
Idaho Mountain Bike license plate. The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation will use the proceeds for the preservation, maintenance and expansion of recreation trails in Idaho.

 


Mountain Biking

Several Idaho State Parks offer single track mountain biking.  
 
 
 

 

Idaho City Area Trails and Yurt System

Another  excellent way to enjoy mountain biking is to take advantage of the Idaho City Area Trails and Yurt System where you can mountain bike by day and spend the night in a backcountry yurt by night. Click here to learn more.
 

Mountain biking on public lands

Mountain bike trails can also be found on trails located in federal lands, which cover 70% of the state.  
 
Boise National Forest mountain bike trail map http://www.fs.fed.us/
Bureau of Land Management trail maps http://www.blm.gov/.

 


Road biking in and around Idaho State Parks

Idaho is a biker's oasis with miles of hard surfaced non-motorized bike trails, many of which are 'rails to trails' projects or old railroad grades converted to pathways.  Three of Idaho's state parks are excellent places to road bike:

Heyburn State Park - Camp at Heyburn and spend a week riding the bike paths of northern Idaho that reach from one side of the state to the other.  

Ponderosa State Park - Take off from Ponderosa State Park to access hard path trails in and around the park.

Lucky Peak State Park -  Pack a picnic and ride from downtown Boise to Lucky Peak State Park on the famous Greenbelt

Bicycle Touring (Road Cycling)

Bicycle Tourism is gaining popularity and we now have several parks that have set up bike-friendly campsites, perfect for the cycle tourist on their cross-state or cross-country journeys!

For more information about Bicycle Tourism and to view a map, click here! For an instructional video on how to use the map, click here

**Please note: These sites are non-reservable.

About

Bicycle Tourism (also known as Road Cycling, Road Biking, and Adventure Cycling) is a form of recreation and tourism in which a bicycle is the primary mode of transportation. The trips are typically focused more on the adventure aspect of travel by bike, rather than competition or strenuous exercise.

Hells Gate State Park – Lewiston, Idaho

A campsite has been set aside specifically for Adventure cyclists, accommodating eight. The site offers access to electricity and a picnic table, with restrooms and shower facilities nearby. Additional open camping areas are available within the park.

The park is located four (4) miles south of US 12 as traffic crosses the Blue Interstate Bridge.  US 95 is six (6) miles west of the intersection with US 12 in North Lewiston.  Jet boat trips into Hells Canyon are available from concessionaires within the park.  Lewiston and Clarkston have approximately 23 miles of paved multi-use trails that connect with Hells Gate State Park.

Contact Hells Gate State Park (208) 799- 5015 to make use arrangements or come to the Lewis and Clark Discovery Center within Hells Gate State Park upon arrival. 

WinchesterWinchester Lake State Park – Winchester, Idaho

A large, lake-view, open area is available specifically for cyclists that will accommodate four, two-man tents on level ground. There is convenient access to a CXT restroom and picnic table. Electricity is available at a nearby fish cleaning station.

The site is located at the end of the road to our Appaloosa camp loop.  Follow the signs to the Fish Cleaning Station, the bicycle campsite is located directly across the road from the fish cleaning station.

Contact Winchester Lake State Park (208) 924-7563 to make use arrangements.

Henrys Lake State Park – Island Park, Idaho

Three campsites have been set aside with space for four cyclists per site. Each site will be within 100 yards of the shower facilities and will have nearby access to restrooms, as well as an on-site table and fire pit. Henrys Lake is approximately 20 miles from Yellowstone National Park, near to the Great Divide Route (section 2), and has beautiful lakeside views of the Centennial Mountains.

The sites are located west of the restroom and fish cleaning station, above the parking lot, on the flat grass area. Park season is approximately May 15 through October, with staff available from 8 am to 6 pm.

Site arrangements can be made by calling the park directly at (208) 558-7532 or by email at HEN@idpr.idaho.gov.

Other great road bike trails in Idaho

Northern Idaho:
Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes - at 73-miles, this trail is the world's longest continually paved trail! 
 
Central Idaho:
 
West Idaho:
 
 
 

Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes Snapshot 

Location
Begins in Plummer, ID
Ends Mullan, ID
There are 19 trailheads and 18 scenic waysides along the trail
Take a virtual tour!

349 miles north of Boise, ID
409 miles northeast of Portland, OR
45 miles southeast of Spokane, WA

26 miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene, ID
140 miles northwest of Missoula, MT
336 miles east of Seattle, WA

 
Elevation
3,400 - 2,200
 
Trail length
72 miles
 
Trail top
10-foot wide asphalt
 
Types of use
Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair
 
Overnight
Camping prohibited on trail, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance
 
Idaho State Parks nearby
Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park
 
What to bring
Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses
 
Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets
Always use lights at night
Obey road crossing signs
 
Winter
Nordic and snowshoe
 
Learning
Interpretive signage, Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park (Sacred Encounters Museum Exhibit)
 
Pets
Yes on leash and under control at all times
 
 

The Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes is a 72-mile paved trail spanning the Idaho panhandle between Mullan and Plummer. It was created through a unique partnership between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Union Pacific Railroad, the U. S. Government, and the State of Idaho. The trail begins in the historic Silver Valley, continues along the Coeur d'Alene River past scenic Lake Coeur d'Alene and through rolling farmlands to Plummer. Twenty developed trailheads provide entry points, and there are seventeen scenic waysides along the route for picnicking.

Trail of the Coeur d'Alene's Commission Member
Downloadable Application

 


Non-Motorized Trail Recreation Summits

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) hosted three (3) summits to discuss issues and solutions pertaining to non-motorized trail recreation in Idaho. The discussions were held in Boise, Coeur d'Alene and Idaho Falls. Below are the meeting handouts and minutes from each location. The open discussions explored all topics pertaining to non-motorized trail recreation in Idaho and ideas for solving the non-motorized trail funding gap.

Boise - February 11, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Boise)

Coeur d'Alene - April 21, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Coeur d'Alene)

Idaho Falls - May 2, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Idaho Falls)

Boise, January 11, 2017

A meeting was held January 11, 2017 to share results of the 2016 summits and to organize a leadership team, willing to take suggestions and strategies through the next very important steps. Download the meeting materials.

Summit Attendees

A complete list of summit attendees is available  for download here.

Next Steps - Use collective report and results from statewide summits to answer the following:

1) Is there a need to address non-motorized trail maintenance in Idaho? 

2) Is there enough support statewide to address non-motorized trail maintenance and related funding in Idaho? 

3) Who will work together to address the need?

4) What does addressing the need look like?

5) What are the necessary actions / future next steps?

Want to take a leadership role? Have questions?

If you have questions, would like to lead in next steaps, or were unable to attend a summit in your area, you can share your thoughts and ideas via email: inquiry@idpr.idaho.gov

 

 

 

 

People from all over the world come to Idaho to enjoy mountain and road biking in some of the most pristine and tranquil locations imaginable.  

 

For mountain bikers, Idaho has more than 12,000 miles of single track trails and at least twice that in 4-wheel-drive dirt roads.  

 

For road bikers, the Trail of the Coeur D'Alene's  is a 72-mile paved path that extends from Plummer, Idaho, to Mullan, Idaho. And don't miss the Coeur d'Alene Parkway.  The parkway is part of the nationally famous North Idaho Centennial Trail, a multi-use recreational trail system that meanders for 24 miles from the Idaho/Washington state line.   Several of Idaho state parks are excellent base camps for a road or mountain bike adventure. Those looking for cycling adventure should also check out the Ashton to Tetonia Trail in East Idaho.

In Idaho, you can support your sport by purchasing an
Idaho Mountain Bike license plate. The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation will use the proceeds for the preservation, maintenance and expansion of recreation trails in Idaho.

 

Mountain Biking

Several Idaho State Parks offer single track mountain biking.  
 
 
 

 

Idaho City Area Trails and Yurt System

Another  excellent way to enjoy mountain biking is to take advantage of the Idaho City Area Trails and Yurt System where you can mountain bike by day and spend the night in a backcountry yurt by night. Click here to learn more.
 

Mountain biking on public lands

Mountain bike trails can also be found on trails located in federal lands, which cover 70% of the state.  
 
Boise National Forest mountain bike trail map http://www.fs.fed.us/
Bureau of Land Management trail maps http://www.blm.gov/.

 

Road biking in and around Idaho State Parks

Idaho is a biker's oasis with miles of hard surfaced non-motorized bike trails, many of which are 'rails to trails' projects or old railroad grades converted to pathways.  Three of Idaho's state parks are excellent places to road bike:

Heyburn State Park - Camp at Heyburn and spend a week riding the bike paths of northern Idaho that reach from one side of the state to the other.  

Ponderosa State Park - Take off from Ponderosa State Park to access hard path trails in and around the park.

Lucky Peak State Park -  Pack a picnic and ride from downtown Boise to Lucky Peak State Park on the famous Greenbelt

Bicycle Touring (Road Cycling)

Bicycle Tourism is gaining popularity and we now have several parks that have set up bike-friendly campsites, perfect for the cycle tourist on their cross-state or cross-country journeys!

For more information about Bicycle Tourism and to view a map, click here! For an instructional video on how to use the map, click here

**Please note: These sites are non-reservable.

About

Bicycle Tourism (also known as Road Cycling, Road Biking, and Adventure Cycling) is a form of recreation and tourism in which a bicycle is the primary mode of transportation. The trips are typically focused more on the adventure aspect of travel by bike, rather than competition or strenuous exercise.

Hells Gate State Park – Lewiston, Idaho

A campsite has been set aside specifically for Adventure cyclists, accommodating eight. The site offers access to electricity and a picnic table, with restrooms and shower facilities nearby. Additional open camping areas are available within the park.

The park is located four (4) miles south of US 12 as traffic crosses the Blue Interstate Bridge.  US 95 is six (6) miles west of the intersection with US 12 in North Lewiston.  Jet boat trips into Hells Canyon are available from concessionaires within the park.  Lewiston and Clarkston have approximately 23 miles of paved multi-use trails that connect with Hells Gate State Park.

Contact Hells Gate State Park (208) 799- 5015 to make use arrangements or come to the Lewis and Clark Discovery Center within Hells Gate State Park upon arrival. 

WinchesterWinchester Lake State Park – Winchester, Idaho

A large, lake-view, open area is available specifically for cyclists that will accommodate four, two-man tents on level ground. There is convenient access to a CXT restroom and picnic table. Electricity is available at a nearby fish cleaning station.

The site is located at the end of the road to our Appaloosa camp loop.  Follow the signs to the Fish Cleaning Station, the bicycle campsite is located directly across the road from the fish cleaning station.

Contact Winchester Lake State Park (208) 924-7563 to make use arrangements.

Henrys Lake State Park – Island Park, Idaho

Three campsites have been set aside with space for four cyclists per site. Each site will be within 100 yards of the shower facilities and will have nearby access to restrooms, as well as an on-site table and fire pit. Henrys Lake is approximately 20 miles from Yellowstone National Park, near to the Great Divide Route (section 2), and has beautiful lakeside views of the Centennial Mountains.

The sites are located west of the restroom and fish cleaning station, above the parking lot, on the flat grass area. Park season is approximately May 15 through October, with staff available from 8 am to 6 pm.

Site arrangements can be made by calling the park directly at (208) 558-7532 or by email at HEN@idpr.idaho.gov.

Other great road bike trails in Idaho

Northern Idaho:
Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes - at 73-miles, this trail is the world's longest continually paved trail! 
 
Central Idaho:
 
West Idaho:
 
 
 

Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes Snapshot 

Location
Begins in Plummer, ID
Ends Mullan, ID
There are 19 trailheads and 18 scenic waysides along the trail
Take a virtual tour!

349 miles north of Boise, ID
409 miles northeast of Portland, OR
45 miles southeast of Spokane, WA

26 miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene, ID
140 miles northwest of Missoula, MT
336 miles east of Seattle, WA

 
Elevation
3,400 - 2,200
 
Trail length
72 miles
 
Trail top
10-foot wide asphalt
 
Types of use
Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair
 
Overnight
Camping prohibited on trail, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance
 
Idaho State Parks nearby
Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park
 
What to bring
Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses
 
Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets
Always use lights at night
Obey road crossing signs
 
Winter
Nordic and snowshoe
 
Learning
Interpretive signage, Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park (Sacred Encounters Museum Exhibit)
 
Pets
Yes on leash and under control at all times
 
 

The Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes is a 72-mile paved trail spanning the Idaho panhandle between Mullan and Plummer. It was created through a unique partnership between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Union Pacific Railroad, the U. S. Government, and the State of Idaho. The trail begins in the historic Silver Valley, continues along the Coeur d'Alene River past scenic Lake Coeur d'Alene and through rolling farmlands to Plummer. Twenty developed trailheads provide entry points, and there are seventeen scenic waysides along the route for picnicking.

Trail of the Coeur d'Alene's Commission Member
Downloadable Application

 

Non-Motorized Trail Recreation Summits

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) hosted three (3) summits to discuss issues and solutions pertaining to non-motorized trail recreation in Idaho. The discussions were held in Boise, Coeur d'Alene and Idaho Falls. Below are the meeting handouts and minutes from each location. The open discussions explored all topics pertaining to non-motorized trail recreation in Idaho and ideas for solving the non-motorized trail funding gap.

Boise - February 11, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Boise)

Coeur d'Alene - April 21, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Coeur d'Alene)

Idaho Falls - May 2, 2016

Meeting Minutes

Presentation (Idaho Falls)

Boise, January 11, 2017

A meeting was held January 11, 2017 to share results of the 2016 summits and to organize a leadership team, willing to take suggestions and strategies through the next very important steps. Download the meeting materials.

Summit Attendees

A complete list of summit attendees is available  for download here.

Next Steps - Use collective report and results from statewide summits to answer the following:

1) Is there a need to address non-motorized trail maintenance in Idaho? 

2) Is there enough support statewide to address non-motorized trail maintenance and related funding in Idaho? 

3) Who will work together to address the need?

4) What does addressing the need look like?

5) What are the necessary actions / future next steps?

Want to take a leadership role? Have questions?

If you have questions, would like to lead in next steaps, or were unable to attend a summit in your area, you can share your thoughts and ideas via email: inquiry@idpr.idaho.gov