Idaho state parks - a beautiful place to play and stay!

Three Island Crossing Snapshot

**The park has been winterized. Sections of the park, including facilities may not be accessible during the winter. Learn more about Three Island Crossing State Park winter opportunities and closures here.**
 
Location
72 miles E of Boise, ID
211 miles W of Idaho Falls, ID
270 miles NWof Salt Lake City, UT
 
Acreage
613
 
Elevation
2,484
 
Open
Year-round
 
Overnight
82 serviced campsites (1 ADA), 8 cabins (2 ADA)
 
Amenities
Flush toilets, showers, dump station, electricity
 
Activities
Camp, picnic, hike, cycle, mountain bike, fish, wildlife and wildflower viewing
 
Groups
Shelters for large groups and campsites, conference room
 
Winter
Trails, hike
 
Wildlife
Waterfowl, songbirds, deer, eagles, swans, fox
 
Learn
Oregon Trail History and Education Center, guided walks, programs, education center
The History Center is open Memorial Day to Labor Day from 9am to 4pm Tuesday thru Sunday and closed on Mondays
(The remainder of the year hours and days of operation may vary. See park website or social media for updates.)
 
Nearby
Airport, golfing, winery, municipal pool, boat docks and launch
 
Rent or buy
Purchase souvenirs, gifts, drinks and snacks at the visitors center nature store
 
WiFi
Yes, all campgrounds and the visitor center
 
GPS coordinates
Lat - 42.94472 | Long -115.31806
 
 

Located just off Interstate 84 at the Glenns Ferry exit, the park offers a full-service campground, eight cabins, picnic areas, historical interpretive programs and a fascinating admission-free interpretive center.

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Welcome to Three Island Crossing State Park

 

Modern travelers will find a stay at Three Island Crossing much more hospitable than did the 19th century Oregon Trail pioneers who crossed the mighty Snake River at this location.  

 

Take a self-guided tour of the park and see the original wagon ruts and Conestoga replicas, visit the Oregon Trail History and Education Center to learn more about pioneers, early settlers and Native American history, dangle your feet or a line in the Snake River where emigrants made their historic crossings or sit under a tree and enjoy a picnic lunch. 


Cabins at Three Island Crossing

Eight cabins rent for $50 per night each. These one-room cabins sleep up to five on bunk beds and futons. Bring your own bedding. Cook outside on the grill-covered fire pit.   The cabins are powered, heated and air conditioned. Click to reserve.

 


Disc Golf at Three Island State Park

Disc golf course map

Scorecard

Download 

 


 
Three Island Crossing Park Fees
 
Those 62 years of age and better receive 50% off camping fees
Monday through Thursday, excluding holidays.
The discount applies only to campsites.
 

Motor Vehicle Entry Fee

$5 per vehicle

Serviced camp site

$22-$38 per night

Cabins

$50 per night

Fees do not include sales tax

 

 


History of Three Island Crossing State Park

Oregon Trail pioneers knew Three Island Crossing well. It was one of the most famous river crossings on the historic trail and the most difficult crossing in Idaho. Crossing the Snake River was always dangerous, but when the water was low enough to negotiate, everyone crossed who could, to take advantage of the more favorable northern route to Fort Boise. During high water, most emigrants were forced to travel along the South Alternate route into Oregon - a dry, sandy, dusty, and hot trail that wore out man and beast.

The original course of the Oregon Trail was from Independence, Missouri to Oregon City in Oregon's Willamette Valley.  Most pioneers traveled the trail from 1841 through 1848. However, fur trappers and explorers used the travel corridor as early as 1811. By the mid-1860s, the trail was used little as an emigration route. 

The Oregon Trail entered Idaho in the southeast corner of the state.  At Fort Hall, it joined the Snake River, following the south bank until this crossing was reached near Glenns Ferry. The route left Idaho near the site of old Fort Boise, near Parma, after winding through 500 miles of the state. 

Upon reaching the Three Island Ford, the emigrants had a difficult decision to make. Should they risk the dangerous crossing of the Snake, or endure the dry, rocky route along the south bank of the river? About half of the emigrants chose to attempt the crossing by using the gravel bars that extended across the river. Not all were successful; many casualties are recounted in pioneer diaries. The rewards of a successful crossing were a shorter route, more potable water and better feed for the stock.

The Three Island Ford was used by pioneer travelers until 1869, when Gus Glenn constructed a ferry about two miles upstream. 

 

 


Three Island Crossing State Park

Javascript is required to view this map.
1083 S Three Island Park Dr, Glenns Ferry, ID 83623

 

Download Three Island Crossing Maps

Park Location Map

Year-Round Trail Map

Aerial Map of Park

Disc Golf Course


See video

The Idaho State Parks Passport: Providing Savings for 2013!

When implemented, the Idaho State Parks Passport will allow Idaho motorists to check "Yes!" to support Idaho State Parks by agreeing to pay an additional $10 in conjunction with renewing their license plates through the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and County Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Offices.  The Passport sticker will allow participating Idahoans unlimited daytime entry to Idaho state parks, IDPR operated recreation areas and boating access sites. The Passport will also provide nightly discounts on camping.  

When you pay the additional $10 for your passport, you'll receive a sticker that will adhere to your motor vehicle.  The sticker will provide unlimited access to all 30 state parks for the entire registration year.  

Out-of-state guests will have a savings option too, with the purchase of an Idaho State Park Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual.

 

What Will $10 Buy You and Your Family?

  • Admittance to all 30 Idaho State Parks for a year
  • Nightly discounts on camping
  • Hundreds of miles of hiking, cycling, mountain biking and Nordic trails
  • Your favorite boat launches
  • Countless historical and cultural sites within your state parks

Good for Idaho, Good for Idahoans!

Idaho‘s State Park Passport is simply a sustainable way to pay for the maintenance and management of Idaho’s 30 cherished state parks.  For those Idahoans who choose to participate in the program, the Idaho State Parks Passport sticker will replace the $5 per motor vehicle entry fee currently in place at state parks while also providing nightly discounts on camping.  

Out of State Guests

Our out-of-state guests have savings options too! You can purchase a $40 Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual and receive access to all of Idaho's State Parks and nightly discounts on camping. MVEF Annuals can be purchased at any Idaho State Park and online.

 

Three Island Crossing Snapshot

**The park has been winterized. Sections of the park, including facilities may not be accessible during the winter. Learn more about Three Island Crossing State Park winter opportunities and closures here.**
 
Location
72 miles E of Boise, ID
211 miles W of Idaho Falls, ID
270 miles NWof Salt Lake City, UT
 
Acreage
613
 
Elevation
2,484
 
Open
Year-round
 
Overnight
82 serviced campsites (1 ADA), 8 cabins (2 ADA)
 
Amenities
Flush toilets, showers, dump station, electricity
 
Activities
Camp, picnic, hike, cycle, mountain bike, fish, wildlife and wildflower viewing
 
Groups
Shelters for large groups and campsites, conference room
 
Winter
Trails, hike
 
Wildlife
Waterfowl, songbirds, deer, eagles, swans, fox
 
Learn
Oregon Trail History and Education Center, guided walks, programs, education center
The History Center is open Memorial Day to Labor Day from 9am to 4pm Tuesday thru Sunday and closed on Mondays
(The remainder of the year hours and days of operation may vary. See park website or social media for updates.)
 
Nearby
Airport, golfing, winery, municipal pool, boat docks and launch
 
Rent or buy
Purchase souvenirs, gifts, drinks and snacks at the visitors center nature store
 
WiFi
Yes, all campgrounds and the visitor center
 
GPS coordinates
Lat - 42.94472 | Long -115.31806
 
 

Located just off Interstate 84 at the Glenns Ferry exit, the park offers a full-service campground, eight cabins, picnic areas, historical interpretive programs and a fascinating admission-free interpretive center.

Next Events

No events found.

See all Three Island Crossing events

Welcome to Three Island Crossing State Park

 

Modern travelers will find a stay at Three Island Crossing much more hospitable than did the 19th century Oregon Trail pioneers who crossed the mighty Snake River at this location.  

 

Take a self-guided tour of the park and see the original wagon ruts and Conestoga replicas, visit the Oregon Trail History and Education Center to learn more about pioneers, early settlers and Native American history, dangle your feet or a line in the Snake River where emigrants made their historic crossings or sit under a tree and enjoy a picnic lunch. 

Cabins at Three Island Crossing

Eight cabins rent for $50 per night each. These one-room cabins sleep up to five on bunk beds and futons. Bring your own bedding. Cook outside on the grill-covered fire pit.   The cabins are powered, heated and air conditioned. Click to reserve.

 

Disc Golf at Three Island State Park

Disc golf course map

Scorecard

Download 

 

 
Three Island Crossing Park Fees
 
Those 62 years of age and better receive 50% off camping fees
Monday through Thursday, excluding holidays.
The discount applies only to campsites.
 

Motor Vehicle Entry Fee

$5 per vehicle

Serviced camp site

$22-$38 per night

Cabins

$50 per night

Fees do not include sales tax

 

 

History of Three Island Crossing State Park

Oregon Trail pioneers knew Three Island Crossing well. It was one of the most famous river crossings on the historic trail and the most difficult crossing in Idaho. Crossing the Snake River was always dangerous, but when the water was low enough to negotiate, everyone crossed who could, to take advantage of the more favorable northern route to Fort Boise. During high water, most emigrants were forced to travel along the South Alternate route into Oregon - a dry, sandy, dusty, and hot trail that wore out man and beast.

The original course of the Oregon Trail was from Independence, Missouri to Oregon City in Oregon's Willamette Valley.  Most pioneers traveled the trail from 1841 through 1848. However, fur trappers and explorers used the travel corridor as early as 1811. By the mid-1860s, the trail was used little as an emigration route. 

The Oregon Trail entered Idaho in the southeast corner of the state.  At Fort Hall, it joined the Snake River, following the south bank until this crossing was reached near Glenns Ferry. The route left Idaho near the site of old Fort Boise, near Parma, after winding through 500 miles of the state. 

Upon reaching the Three Island Ford, the emigrants had a difficult decision to make. Should they risk the dangerous crossing of the Snake, or endure the dry, rocky route along the south bank of the river? About half of the emigrants chose to attempt the crossing by using the gravel bars that extended across the river. Not all were successful; many casualties are recounted in pioneer diaries. The rewards of a successful crossing were a shorter route, more potable water and better feed for the stock.

The Three Island Ford was used by pioneer travelers until 1869, when Gus Glenn constructed a ferry about two miles upstream. 

 

 

Three Island Crossing State Park

Javascript is required to view this map.
1083 S Three Island Park Dr, Glenns Ferry, ID 83623

 

Download Three Island Crossing Maps

Park Location Map

Year-Round Trail Map

Aerial Map of Park

Disc Golf Course

See video

The Idaho State Parks Passport: Providing Savings for 2013!

When implemented, the Idaho State Parks Passport will allow Idaho motorists to check "Yes!" to support Idaho State Parks by agreeing to pay an additional $10 in conjunction with renewing their license plates through the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and County Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Offices.  The Passport sticker will allow participating Idahoans unlimited daytime entry to Idaho state parks, IDPR operated recreation areas and boating access sites. The Passport will also provide nightly discounts on camping.  

When you pay the additional $10 for your passport, you'll receive a sticker that will adhere to your motor vehicle.  The sticker will provide unlimited access to all 30 state parks for the entire registration year.  

Out-of-state guests will have a savings option too, with the purchase of an Idaho State Park Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual.

 

What Will $10 Buy You and Your Family?

  • Admittance to all 30 Idaho State Parks for a year
  • Nightly discounts on camping
  • Hundreds of miles of hiking, cycling, mountain biking and Nordic trails
  • Your favorite boat launches
  • Countless historical and cultural sites within your state parks

Good for Idaho, Good for Idahoans!

Idaho‘s State Park Passport is simply a sustainable way to pay for the maintenance and management of Idaho’s 30 cherished state parks.  For those Idahoans who choose to participate in the program, the Idaho State Parks Passport sticker will replace the $5 per motor vehicle entry fee currently in place at state parks while also providing nightly discounts on camping.  

Out of State Guests

Our out-of-state guests have savings options too! You can purchase a $40 Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual and receive access to all of Idaho's State Parks and nightly discounts on camping. MVEF Annuals can be purchased at any Idaho State Park and online.