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Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes Snapshot 

Location

Begins in Plummer, ID

Ends Mullan, ID

There are 20 trailheads and 20 scenic waysides along the trail
Take a virtual tour! (link is external)

349 miles north of Boise, ID
409 miles northeast of Portland, OR
45 miles southeast of Spokane, WA
26 miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene, ID
140 miles northwest of Missoula, MT
336 miles east of Seattle, WA

Elevation

3,400 - 2,200

Trail length

73.2 miles

Trail top

10-foot wide asphalt

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair, Nordic skiing, snowshoeing

Overnight

Camping is prohibited along the trail or within the trail right-of-way, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance

Idaho State Parks nearby

Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses

Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets

Always use lights at night

Obey road crossing signs

Winter

Nordic, snowshoe, and fat tire bikes

Learning

Interpretive programs, signs, exhibits, Jr. Ranger programs at both , Heyburn State Park and Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park.  Sacred Encounters: Father DeSmet and the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West on permanent display at Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park.

Pets

Yes on leash and under control at all times

Winter Recreation

Winter recreation opportunities are various and rewarding.  When conditions exist, sections of the trail are groomed and packed for winter recreation.  Please contact trail staff at 208.682.3814 or old@idpr.idaho.gov for the latest conditions.

 

The Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes is a 73-mile paved trail spanning the Idaho panhandle between Mullan and Plummer. It was created through a unique partnership between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Union Pacific Railroad, the U. S. Government, and the State of Idaho. The trail meanders through the historic Silver Valley, along the Coeur d'Alene River past scenic Lake Coeur d'Alene and through rolling farmlands to Plummer. Twenty developed trailheads provide entry points, and there are twenty scenic waysides along the route with tables to stop for a picnic or a short rest..

Trail of the Coeur d'Alene's Commission Member
Downloadable Application

 



History of the Trail

The "Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes" is one of the most spectacular and popular trails in the western United States and is listed as one of the top 25 by the Rails-to-
Trails Conservancy.  Here, you will find 73 miles of asphalt that’s perfect for bicycles, walkers, or skaters.

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes nearly spans the Panhandle of Idaho as it runs along rivers, lakes, and scenic landscapes. The uniqueness of the trail isn’t simply the beautiful scenery and attractions along its route, but it’s an innovative solution to the environmental problems caused by the early mining activities.

Silver was discovered in the area in 1884 and soon a rail line was constructed to support the growing mining, timber, and supply industries.  Much of the trail today follows this original rail line, giving it a gentle grade. When the rail line was built, mine waste rock and tailings containing heavy metals were used for the original rail bed. In addition, the bed was contaminated with accidental ore concentrate spillage.

The trail itself is part of the environmental cleanup in a partnership between the Union Pacific Railroad, the U.S. Government, the State of Idaho and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. The thick layer of asphalt and gravel barriers along the trail edge serve as a clean barrier.  Please stay on the trail and in designated picnic areas.

You don’t have to be fit to enjoy this trail with its gentle grade and smooth surface.  There are 20 trailheads and 20 scenic waysides with picnic tables and benches.  The east end passes through a narrow mountain valley once heavily mined for silver and is dotted with numerous small historic mining communities.  The middle section follows the tranquil Coeur d’Alene River, passing fifteen small lakes and marshes. The west end lies within the interior boundaries of the Coeur d’Alene Indian Reservation and along the shoreline of scenic Coeur d’Alene Lake before crossing the 3,100-foot Chatcolet Bridge/Trestle to Heyburn State Park.  The trail then follows the remote forested Plummer Creek Canyon and continues to Plummer.

The Trail is managed by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe.  Many miles of private land are adjacent to the trail corridor.  Please stay on the trail to respect landowner privacy and do not trespass on the numerous private docks and boats.

Winter Recreation

Winter recreation opportunities are various and rewarding.  When conditions exist, sections of the trail are groomed and packed for winter recreation.  Please contact trail staff at 208.682.3814 or old@idpr.idaho.gov for the latest conditions.

Types of Use Allowed

  • Walking, in-line skating, bicycling, skateboarding, Nordic skiing and snowshoeing.

Uses Not Allowed or Prohibited

  • Hunting and/or trapping is prohibited within the trail right-of-way.
  • The discharging of firearms or hunting from or across the trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Horses or pack stock on or within the entire trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Camping along or within the entire trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited.

Protect Yourself by Following the Rules

  • Carry water for drinking and washing.  Do not drink surface water even if filtered.  Safe water sources can be found in most communities.
  • Slower traffic has the right-of-way, bikers yield to pedestrians.
  • Do not block path, ride no more than two abreast.
  • Keep right except to pass, signal when approaching from the rear.
  • Do not litter, and stay on the trail.
  • Keep pets leashed and pack out excrement.  Pets must be on a short leash at all times.
  • Wash hands and face before eating, eat at designated waysides and trailheads. Remove dirt from clothes, toys, pets, shoes, and equipment before leaving the area.
  • Do not let children play near shorelines or off the trail.

Group Use

Any group wishing to ride, or host a special event or commercial activity on the trail, must have authorization from the state and/or tribe trail manager. Please contact state trail staff at (208) 682-3814 for more information.

 


The Idaho State Parks Passport: Your State Park Saving Option!

The Idaho State Parks Passport allows Idaho motorists to support Idaho State Parks by agreeing to pay an additional $10 in conjunction with renewing their license plates through the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and County Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Offices.  The Passport sticker allows participating Idahoans unlimited daytime entry to Idaho state parks, IDPR operated recreation areas and boating access sites. The Passport will also provide nightly discounts on camping.  

When you pay the additional $10 for your passport, you'll receive a sticker that will adhere to your motor vehicle.  The sticker will provide unlimited access to all 30 state parks for the entire registration year.  

Out-of-state guests will have a savings option too, with the purchase of an Idaho State Park Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual.

 

What Will $10 Buy You and Your Family?

  • Admittance to all 30 Idaho State Parks for a year
  • Hundreds of miles of hiking, cycling, mountain biking and Nordic trails
  • Your favorite boat launches
  • Countless historical and cultural sites within your state parks

Good for Idaho, Good for Idahoans!

Idaho‘s State Park Passport is simply a sustainable way to pay for the maintenance and management of Idaho’s 30 cherished state parks.  For those Idahoans who choose to participate in the program, the Idaho State Parks Passport sticker will replace the $5 per motor vehicle entry fee currently in place at state parks while also providing nightly discounts on camping.  

Out of State Guests

Our out-of-state guests have savings options too! You can purchase a $40 Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual and receive access to all of Idaho's State Parks and nightly discounts on camping. MVEF Annuals can be purchased at any Idaho State Park and online.

 


Calling All Explorers Ages 6-12!

We invite you to be an official Idaho State Park Junior Ranger. We need you to help keep Idaho's State Parks beautiful and protect the plants and animals that live here. Simply pick up a Junior Ranger Guide and earn stamps and prizes for completing fun activities.

You'll Get To...

  • Take a HIKE
  • IDENTIFY special plants and animals
  • Help keep your campsite and the park clean
  • Go to an interpretive program to hear PARK STORIES
  • Learn to be SAFE in parks and on trails, rivers and lakes.

Get Started...

  1. Pick up the Junior Ranger Guide
  2. Collect stamps for each completed activity from a staff person or campground host.
  3. Complete four out of six options for activities to be awarded recognition 
  4. On your first park visit earn the Junior Ranger badge, your second visit the patch, and a third visit a certificate signed by Scout!

Parents and Guardians:

Our goal is to help your children have fun in the outdoors while learning about state parks and making connections to the natural world. Please feel free to join your
children in the Junior Ranger activities. We think you'll have a great time too!

Participating Parks:

Castle Rocks State Park
City of Rocks National Reserve *
Farragut State Park
Lake Cascade State Park
Dworshak State Park
Hells Gate State Park
Ponderosa State Park
Priest Lake State Park
Three Island Crossing State Park
Bruneau Dunes State Park
Harriman State Park *
Heyburn State Park
Henrys Lake State Park
Land of Yankee Fork State Park
Massacre Rocks State Park
Round Lake State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Lucky Peak State Park
Lake Walcott State Park
Winchester Lake State Park
Eagle Island State Park
Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes
Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park *


This list includes Idaho State Parks that offer the Junior Ranger program from Memorial Day through September.

*These parks offer Junior Ranger programs year-round.


Birding & Wildlife Viewing

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes passes through a diverse landscape with numerous habitats making it one of the best birding locales in North Idaho.  Here you will find mixed conifer forests, wetlands, agricultural fields, urban streetscapes, cottonwood groves, and deep water.  According to the Coeur d’Alene Audubon, the Trail bisects all the major low-elevation habitat types found in North Idaho.  This habitat profile yields a potential list of 189 species, plus an additional 48 very rare species.

The diverse habitats are also home to an abundant array of wildlife that call North Idaho home.  Elk, white-tailed Deer, and Moose are commonly seen.  Keep an eye out for smaller mammals such as coyote, beaver, muskrat and river otters.  Squirrels and chipmunks are commonly seen and heard.  Please keep a safe distance from all wildlife and help protect their environment.

 

Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes Birding Checklist:

Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes Snapshot 

Location

Begins in Plummer, ID

Ends Mullan, ID

There are 20 trailheads and 20 scenic waysides along the trail
Take a virtual tour! (link is external)

349 miles north of Boise, ID
409 miles northeast of Portland, OR
45 miles southeast of Spokane, WA
26 miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene, ID
140 miles northwest of Missoula, MT
336 miles east of Seattle, WA

Elevation

3,400 - 2,200

Trail length

73.2 miles

Trail top

10-foot wide asphalt

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair, Nordic skiing, snowshoeing

Overnight

Camping is prohibited along the trail or within the trail right-of-way, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance

Idaho State Parks nearby

Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses

Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets

Always use lights at night

Obey road crossing signs

Winter

Nordic, snowshoe, and fat tire bikes

Learning

Interpretive programs, signs, exhibits, Jr. Ranger programs at both , Heyburn State Park and Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park.  Sacred Encounters: Father DeSmet and the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West on permanent display at Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park.

Pets

Yes on leash and under control at all times

Winter Recreation

Winter recreation opportunities are various and rewarding.  When conditions exist, sections of the trail are groomed and packed for winter recreation.  Please contact trail staff at 208.682.3814 or old@idpr.idaho.gov for the latest conditions.

 

The Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes is a 73-mile paved trail spanning the Idaho panhandle between Mullan and Plummer. It was created through a unique partnership between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Union Pacific Railroad, the U. S. Government, and the State of Idaho. The trail meanders through the historic Silver Valley, along the Coeur d'Alene River past scenic Lake Coeur d'Alene and through rolling farmlands to Plummer. Twenty developed trailheads provide entry points, and there are twenty scenic waysides along the route with tables to stop for a picnic or a short rest..

Trail of the Coeur d'Alene's Commission Member
Downloadable Application

 

History of the Trail

The "Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes" is one of the most spectacular and popular trails in the western United States and is listed as one of the top 25 by the Rails-to-
Trails Conservancy.  Here, you will find 73 miles of asphalt that’s perfect for bicycles, walkers, or skaters.

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes nearly spans the Panhandle of Idaho as it runs along rivers, lakes, and scenic landscapes. The uniqueness of the trail isn’t simply the beautiful scenery and attractions along its route, but it’s an innovative solution to the environmental problems caused by the early mining activities.

Silver was discovered in the area in 1884 and soon a rail line was constructed to support the growing mining, timber, and supply industries.  Much of the trail today follows this original rail line, giving it a gentle grade. When the rail line was built, mine waste rock and tailings containing heavy metals were used for the original rail bed. In addition, the bed was contaminated with accidental ore concentrate spillage.

The trail itself is part of the environmental cleanup in a partnership between the Union Pacific Railroad, the U.S. Government, the State of Idaho and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. The thick layer of asphalt and gravel barriers along the trail edge serve as a clean barrier.  Please stay on the trail and in designated picnic areas.

You don’t have to be fit to enjoy this trail with its gentle grade and smooth surface.  There are 20 trailheads and 20 scenic waysides with picnic tables and benches.  The east end passes through a narrow mountain valley once heavily mined for silver and is dotted with numerous small historic mining communities.  The middle section follows the tranquil Coeur d’Alene River, passing fifteen small lakes and marshes. The west end lies within the interior boundaries of the Coeur d’Alene Indian Reservation and along the shoreline of scenic Coeur d’Alene Lake before crossing the 3,100-foot Chatcolet Bridge/Trestle to Heyburn State Park.  The trail then follows the remote forested Plummer Creek Canyon and continues to Plummer.

The Trail is managed by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe.  Many miles of private land are adjacent to the trail corridor.  Please stay on the trail to respect landowner privacy and do not trespass on the numerous private docks and boats.

Winter Recreation

Winter recreation opportunities are various and rewarding.  When conditions exist, sections of the trail are groomed and packed for winter recreation.  Please contact trail staff at 208.682.3814 or old@idpr.idaho.gov for the latest conditions.

Types of Use Allowed

  • Walking, in-line skating, bicycling, skateboarding, Nordic skiing and snowshoeing.

Uses Not Allowed or Prohibited

  • Hunting and/or trapping is prohibited within the trail right-of-way.
  • The discharging of firearms or hunting from or across the trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Horses or pack stock on or within the entire trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Camping along or within the entire trail corridor is prohibited.
  • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited.

Protect Yourself by Following the Rules

  • Carry water for drinking and washing.  Do not drink surface water even if filtered.  Safe water sources can be found in most communities.
  • Slower traffic has the right-of-way, bikers yield to pedestrians.
  • Do not block path, ride no more than two abreast.
  • Keep right except to pass, signal when approaching from the rear.
  • Do not litter, and stay on the trail.
  • Keep pets leashed and pack out excrement.  Pets must be on a short leash at all times.
  • Wash hands and face before eating, eat at designated waysides and trailheads. Remove dirt from clothes, toys, pets, shoes, and equipment before leaving the area.
  • Do not let children play near shorelines or off the trail.

Group Use

Any group wishing to ride, or host a special event or commercial activity on the trail, must have authorization from the state and/or tribe trail manager. Please contact state trail staff at (208) 682-3814 for more information.

 

The Idaho State Parks Passport: Your State Park Saving Option!

The Idaho State Parks Passport allows Idaho motorists to support Idaho State Parks by agreeing to pay an additional $10 in conjunction with renewing their license plates through the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and County Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Offices.  The Passport sticker allows participating Idahoans unlimited daytime entry to Idaho state parks, IDPR operated recreation areas and boating access sites. The Passport will also provide nightly discounts on camping.  

When you pay the additional $10 for your passport, you'll receive a sticker that will adhere to your motor vehicle.  The sticker will provide unlimited access to all 30 state parks for the entire registration year.  

Out-of-state guests will have a savings option too, with the purchase of an Idaho State Park Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual.

 

What Will $10 Buy You and Your Family?

  • Admittance to all 30 Idaho State Parks for a year
  • Hundreds of miles of hiking, cycling, mountain biking and Nordic trails
  • Your favorite boat launches
  • Countless historical and cultural sites within your state parks

Good for Idaho, Good for Idahoans!

Idaho‘s State Park Passport is simply a sustainable way to pay for the maintenance and management of Idaho’s 30 cherished state parks.  For those Idahoans who choose to participate in the program, the Idaho State Parks Passport sticker will replace the $5 per motor vehicle entry fee currently in place at state parks while also providing nightly discounts on camping.  

Out of State Guests

Our out-of-state guests have savings options too! You can purchase a $40 Motor Vehicle Entry Fee (MVEF) Annual and receive access to all of Idaho's State Parks and nightly discounts on camping. MVEF Annuals can be purchased at any Idaho State Park and online.

 

Calling All Explorers Ages 6-12!

We invite you to be an official Idaho State Park Junior Ranger. We need you to help keep Idaho's State Parks beautiful and protect the plants and animals that live here. Simply pick up a Junior Ranger Guide and earn stamps and prizes for completing fun activities.

You'll Get To...

  • Take a HIKE
  • IDENTIFY special plants and animals
  • Help keep your campsite and the park clean
  • Go to an interpretive program to hear PARK STORIES
  • Learn to be SAFE in parks and on trails, rivers and lakes.

Get Started...

  1. Pick up the Junior Ranger Guide
  2. Collect stamps for each completed activity from a staff person or campground host.
  3. Complete four out of six options for activities to be awarded recognition 
  4. On your first park visit earn the Junior Ranger badge, your second visit the patch, and a third visit a certificate signed by Scout!

Parents and Guardians:

Our goal is to help your children have fun in the outdoors while learning about state parks and making connections to the natural world. Please feel free to join your
children in the Junior Ranger activities. We think you'll have a great time too!

Participating Parks:

Castle Rocks State Park
City of Rocks National Reserve *
Farragut State Park
Lake Cascade State Park
Dworshak State Park
Hells Gate State Park
Ponderosa State Park
Priest Lake State Park
Three Island Crossing State Park
Bruneau Dunes State Park
Harriman State Park *
Heyburn State Park
Henrys Lake State Park
Land of Yankee Fork State Park
Massacre Rocks State Park
Round Lake State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Lucky Peak State Park
Lake Walcott State Park
Winchester Lake State Park
Eagle Island State Park
Trail of the Coeur d' Alenes
Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park *


This list includes Idaho State Parks that offer the Junior Ranger program from Memorial Day through September.

*These parks offer Junior Ranger programs year-round.

Birding & Wildlife Viewing

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes passes through a diverse landscape with numerous habitats making it one of the best birding locales in North Idaho.  Here you will find mixed conifer forests, wetlands, agricultural fields, urban streetscapes, cottonwood groves, and deep water.  According to the Coeur d’Alene Audubon, the Trail bisects all the major low-elevation habitat types found in North Idaho.  This habitat profile yields a potential list of 189 species, plus an additional 48 very rare species.

The diverse habitats are also home to an abundant array of wildlife that call North Idaho home.  Elk, white-tailed Deer, and Moose are commonly seen.  Keep an eye out for smaller mammals such as coyote, beaver, muskrat and river otters.  Squirrels and chipmunks are commonly seen and heard.  Please keep a safe distance from all wildlife and help protect their environment.

 

Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes Birding Checklist: