We foster experiences that renew the human spirit and promote community vitality.


Disc Golf:

(Above - Disc Golf at Eagle Island State Park)

The historic use of "flying discs" has been noted throughout the world, so it is difficult to pin point exactly when and where disc golf started. What we do know, is that in 1976 "Steady" Ed Headrick started the Disc Golf Association and is coined with the popularity of modern disc golf and many frisbee sports. 

Idaho state parks are jumping on the disc golf train and new courses are popping up all over the state.

Check out these parks that host disc golf courses:

Hells Gate State Park near Lewiston, ID
Lake Walcott State Park near Burley, ID 
Farragut State Park near Coeur d' Alene, ID
Massacre Rocks State Park near Pocatello, ID 

 

Snowshoeing: 

Get out and enjoy the crisp winter air!

 

Many of our parks and recreational areas are perfect for snowshoeing! From the tip of the panhandle to the furthest reachest of the southern corners, there are plenty of trails to explore in this nordic wonderland!

 

Snowmobiling:

 

There seemingly endless miles upon miles of trails for snowmobiling in Idaho.

Click here to see an interactive map of where to ride!

 


 

 

 

Recreation in Idaho State Parks varies by season. 

Planning Your Summer Vacation

The nine-month reservation window is now open, meaning you can book stays for up to nine months in advanced. Don't waste your time worrying whether you're going to get a campsite or not--plan ahead and have one ready when you get there. We have tent and RV sites, cabins, houses, and yurts available year-round (weather dependent) so no matter what kind of camper you are--there is a campsite for you.

Reservations can be made toll-free by phone at: 1-888-922-6743 (Agents are available 7 days a week, Monday-Friday from 8:00am - 7:00pm Mountain Standard Time and Saturday & Sunday 9:00am - 5:00pm Mountain Time) or online here.

 


Hiking in Idaho State Parks

Idaho state parks in every region of the state have excellent opportunities for hiking and learning about the natural and historical significance of the environment. Visit these Idaho state parks for exceptional hiking opportunities:
 

Partnerships that support Idaho's recreation and tourism

Created in 1988-1989, IRTI is an enduring coalition of state and federal agencies and non-profit organizations working together to provide Idaho citizens and visitors with statewide recreation opportunities. We work to provide our citizens and visitors with public information, services, and connections to Idaho's best sites and activities. IRTI has supported Idaho's recreation and tourism with these efforts for over 30 years:

  • Statewide campground directory
     
  • Idaho Scenic Byways System
     
  • Guides: Idaho Watchable Wildlife Viewing, Idaho Birding Trails
     
  • Be Outside Idaho, Free Fishing Day, Bird by Bird Idaho, Unplug & Be Outside Days, Bogus Basin Ski, and other youth outdoor activities
     
  • Idaho Department of Commerce & Tourism's "Visit Idaho" travel information
     
  • Trail access and use: motorized, non-motorized, and bikes
     
  • Statewide recreation and tourism conferences, special events, and activities

 

 


Park N' Ski in Idaho

Strap on the skis or snowshoes and enjoy the snow at any of 17 Park N' Ski areas across Idaho. Over 180 miles of groomed and un-groomed trails are marked in some of the most scenic areas in Idaho. 

Revenues from the sale of permits go toward plowing parking lots and improving Nordic ski and snowshoe opportunities. Upon purchasing, skiers and snowshoers can designate which park they would like to have receive their fee. This gives permit purchasers an opportunity to help make improvements to an area of their choice.

Additionally, annual permits are good at Park N' Ski areas in Oregon due to a reciprocity agreement. You must purchase and display your permit in the proper location on your vehicle in order to avoid citations.

The Park N' Ski program is managed primarily by Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, with cooperation and support from U.S. Forest Service, the Idaho Department of Lands, the Idaho Department of Transportation, and many local recreation user groups who provide volunteer trail-enhancement work to make it all possible.

Park N' Ski Locations

There are 17 Park N' Ski locations throughout Idaho. Park N' Ski permits are required November 15 - April 30. Visit the regional links on the left to learn more about access statewide.

 

 
 
Fees
 
Annual Pass: $25
Three-day permit:  $7.50
 
Where does the money go?  Revenues for the sales of these permits go back directly toward trail improvements, plowing parking lots and grooming trails. 

How to Purchase a Permit

Purchase on-line
Purchase at local vendors

 

 

 


Idaho City Backcountry Yurts

>>> Click here to download a trail map that is geo-referenced and both printable and downloadable. The geo-referenced maps work well in a free app called Avenza. With Avenza, you can use your phone's gps tracking without wifi connection.

>>> Click here for instructions on how to download the Avenza app.

Reservations for Backcountry Yurt stays can be made nine-months in advance of your intended stay, toll-free by phone at: 1-888-922-6743 (Agents are available 7 days a week, Monday-Friday from 8:00am - 7:00pm mountain time Saturday & Sunday 9:00am - 5:00pm mountain time) or online.

>>>Click Here for Avalanche Updates

Current Snow Conditions

For updates on grooming status and trail conditions: Call the Idaho City Area Park N’ Ski recorded snowline at 208- 514-2423.

Regional snow conditions, including depth(link is external).

For road conditions, visit the 511 website.

For avalanche reports, visit Avalanche.org


Want to know more about the Backcountry Yurts? Check out The Ultimate Guide from The Mandagie Family and Visit Idaho
Click
here to read the guide!

Includes everything from how to get there, where to park, and what to pack.

Don't forget to read the IDPR Winter Yurt Manual before you go!

**We always recommend a high-clearance, all-wheel drive vehicle when traveling to the yurts.


About the Yurt System

If you really want to get away from it all Idaho City Backcountry Yurts, located about 1.5 hours (56-63 miles) north of Boise, ID, depending on the season choice, they are accessible by hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, Nordic or snowshoeing.  

The video below is recommended viewing for both experienced and first time yurt users. It illustrates the basics of the yurt experience and provides users with tips on how to make your yurt stay more enjoyable.

You can choose from six fabulous backcountry yurts which are accessible year-round.

  • Banner Ridge
  • Elkhorn
  • Skyline
  • Rocky Ridge
  • Stargaze
  • Hennessy 

Each yurt sleeps six people in a comfortably well-furnished atmosphere with high mountain views, no neighbors and access to a wide variety of recreational opportunities including hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, Nordic and Telemark skiing and snowshoeing. In winter, backcountry yurts are accessed by a 2-3 mile ski or snowshoe trek; in summer, a 10-minute to one-mile hike.  Our backcountry yurts have plenty to offer every outdoor enthusiast at any level, whether beginner or experienced.

Elkhorn Yurt

 

Click here or on the image above to view a 360 degree tour of the Elkhorn yurt.

Stargaze Yurt

Click here or on the image above to view a 360 degree tour of the Stargaze yurt.

Current Snow Conditions

For updates on grooming status and trail conditions: Call the Idaho City Area Park N’ Ski recorded snowline at 208- 514-2423.

Regional snow conditions, including depth.

For road conditions, visit the 511 website.

For avalanche reports, visit Avalanche.org

Fees

$115 per night

 

Note: Use fees are per night for a party of up to 6.

Additional per person fees are $12 per person/ per night for a party greater than 6, with a maximum of 9 allowed. 

There is a $10 plus tax non-refundable reservation fee charged at the time of booking.

Cancellation Policy

If a cancellation for a Backcountry Yurt occurs 21 or fewer calendar days prior to arrival, customer forfeits the first night or daily usage fee (base rate).  If the cancellation occurs more than 21 calendar days prior to arrival, a cancellation charge of $10.00 will be assessed. At no time shall the customer be charged a cancellation fee that exceeds the base rate paid for the facility.

Questions? Email the program or call 208-514-2418.

Backcountry Yurt Reservation Forms, Maps & Manuals

Please contact the Idaho City Ranger District at 208-392-3700 to obtain a map and get updates as to which trails are safe to recreate on before you go out and play.

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation Backcountry Yurt Program operates on United States Forest Service Land under agreements with the Boise National Forest.

 


Idaho Snowmobile Program

The Idaho snowmobile program is funded through certificate of number fees purchased by snowmobilers. On November 1 of each year every snowmobile operated on private or public land must be numbered. Certificate of number fees are $32.50 for residents and non-residents and $62.50 for rental machines. Note: non-residents are not exempt from purchasing an Idaho snowmobile certificate of number.

Numbering statistics are available here under the 'planning and statistics' tab. 

Economic Impact

Download the Economic Impact and Importance of Snowmobiling in Idaho.

Designations

To ensure the area you ride has enough funding to operate throughout the season, please designate your certificate of number fees to the county you ride.

How is your certificate of number fee broken down?

  • $1.50 vendor fee
  • $1.00 snowmobile related Search and Rescue efforts
  • 85% goes to the county operated snowmobile grooming programs 
  • Up to 15% goes to administration fees and the printing costs of registration stickers.

What are the certificate of number fees used for?

  • Grooming
  • Parking lot plowing
  • Signing
  • Clearing groomed trails
  • Avalanche classes
  • New rider classes

When does grooming occur?

Grooming happens as weather, snow and safety permit. The below bullets briefly identify when programs groom trails.

  • When safety of the equipment and operators are not a concern.
  • When there is a minimum of 18” of snow in the parking lot.
  • When avalanche conditions do not pose a safety concern for grooming operations.
  • When the grooming temperatures are between -20⁰F and 40⁰F.

 


My Winter Vehicle

What's Required?

Yes No
Yes No


Snowmobile Safety

View or download the "Snowmobiling in Idaho" brochure

Since avalanches are the number one cause of snowmobile fatalities in the west, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is presenting a free snowmobile based Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue clinics near you. These practical and popular classes familiarize the winter backcountry enthusiast with hazard recognition and techniques for safe travel in avalanche terrain.


Winter Updates
Avalanche Warnings, Road Conditions, & Weather Reports


 

Click here for Snowmobile Safety Course or Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue Clinic course registration and information 

These classes are divided into classroom and field exercises and are held regularly during winter months. For information about dates of classes in your region, contact your region coordinator:

Northern Idaho
(208) 769-1511
 
Southeast Idaho
(208) 525-7121
 
Southwest Idaho
(208) 514-2414

5 key safety guidelines when riding in avalanche terrain

  • GET THE GEAR: Ensure everyone has an avalanche transceiver, shovel, and probe on their person and knows how to use them.
  • GET THE TRAINING: Take an avalanche course.
  • GET THE FORECAST: Make a riding plan based on the current avalanche and weather forecast.
  • GET THE PICTURE: If you see recent avalanche activity unstable snow exists. Riding on or underneath slopes is dangerous.
  • GET OUT OF HARM'S WAY: One at a time on all avalanche slopes. Don't go to help your stuck friend. Don’t group up in runout zones.

Avalanche Equipment

Make sure you and the people you ride with carry and know how to use the following avalanche equipment:

  • Avalanche transceiver 
  • Backcountry snow shovel 
  • Avalanche probe 
  • Backpack to keep gear on snowmobiler, not machine

EIGHT STEPS TO REDUCING YOUR AVALANCHE RISK

1.  Get smart! The smart first step is to learn from the avalanche experts. This will take a commitment of time and effort on your part. Divide the task into three parts. First, take an avalanche course. Second, check out the videos on avalanche safety. Third, do some reading and expand on what you have learned. 

2.  Utilize your resources. 

WWW.AVALANCHE.ORG

Sawtooth Avalanche Center (208) 622-8027

Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center  (208) 765-7323

Payette Avalanche Center (208) 634-0409

3.  Identify avalanche terrain. Avalanches run repeatedly year after year in the same areas/slopes called avalanche paths. Avalanches most often start on slopes of 30-45 degrees but sometimes start on slopes as shallow as 25 degrees and as steep as 50 degrees. Knowing the slope angle is “rule number one” in recognizing avalanche terrain, for once slope angles reach 30 degrees, you are in potential avalanche terrain regardless of all other factors.

4.  Read nature’s signs. Sometimes the snow shows clear and present danger signs of avalanche. Some signs are a fresh avalanche, snow collapsing beneath you or creating noticeable cracks. Some weather signs that the hazard could be worsening fast are heavy snowfall -- more than one inch per hour -- or strong winds creating blowing snow and snow plumes off the ridges.

5.  Test the snow. Look for test slopes where you can dig snowpits and perform stress tests. A test slope is a small, steep slope, preferably 30 degrees or steeper, where you will not be in danger of causing an avalanche, but is close to a larger slope that you are concerned about. You can learn all about snowpits while attending Idaho Parks and Recreations Avalanche Awareness course.

6.  Travel smart. There are several rules of safe backcountry travel that will help to minimize your avalanche risk. One at a time.  Only one person at a time should go onto the slope.  Avoid the center. The greatest danger on any steep slope comes when you are in the middle of it.  Stay on shallow slopes. You can always travel on avalanche-free slopes up to 25 degrees. Never ride alone.

7.  Take your pulse. In other words, check your attitude. It can get you in trouble. Are you so goal-oriented to climb this peak or highmark that slope that you are willing to take unwarranted risk? Do not overlook clear and present danger signs! Do not fall into peer pressure! Are you letting haste or fatigue get you in trouble? To prevent accidents from happening, you must control the human factor in your decision-making.  Know your limitations.

8.  Be ready for rescue. There are three parts to the rescue equation that will reduce your risk: what equipment to carry, what to do if you are caught, and what to do if a friend is caught.  

Rescue gear. A snow shovel, probe and a beacon are the items that everyone who goes into the backcountry should not be without. Do not abandon the search or send searchers out for additional help: You are the buried victim’s best chance for survival.

 

Snowmobile safety basics
  • Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. 
  • Always keep to the right on snowmobile trails. 
  • Don't ride alone; two snowmobiles traveling together are much safer than one. 
  • Don't drink alcohol and ride. 
  • Always carry basic emergency and survival equipment (below). 
  • Be familiar with your snowmobile; try short trips and practice in open areas to become thoroughly familiar with its controls and operation before going on extended trips. 
  • Always wear adequate winter clothing and protective glasses, goggles or face shields. Use sun screen to protect your skin from sunburn.

Snowmobile survival kit

  • Avalanche transceiver, probe and shovel
  • Waterproof matches in a waterproof container 
  • Several disposable lighters 
  • Cell phone 
  • Plastic whistle 
  • Map, compass, GPS 
  • Small flashlight with extra batteries 
  • 50 feet of 1/4-inch rope 
  • First aid kit 
  • Space blanket 
  • Candles 
  • High energy food 
  • Signal mirror 
  • Knife 
  • Metal cup 
  • Folding saw 
  • Extra drive belt, spark plugs and tool kit 
  • Tarpaulin or plastic windbreak
 

Snowmobiling is a fun and exciting sport that enables people of all ages to enjoy the outdoors in the winter. Each year in Idaho the sport continues to grow. While snowmobiling is one of the best ways to enjoy Idaho’s backcountry, it can be hazardous if you aren’t prepared.

See all Snowmobiling events


Snowmobiling:

Snowmobiling can be a great choice for winter outdoor recreation. But, as always, ensure that you are prepared! Read more about IDPR snowmobiling here before you hit the hills.

For further education, sign up for one of our Snowmobile Safety Courses. Classes are available across the state. Click here and select Link to Snow Classes. 

Want to find out where to ride?

Join the Idaho State Snowmobiling Association!

Park N' Ski:

There are various locations across the state where you can simply park your car and hit the slopes.

But be aware that you do need a Park N' Ski pass. These can be purchased in two forms--either a three day pass or an annual pass. 

Please note, that there is no one day option, only a three day option. But you are welcome to use the pass as little or as frequently as you choose in that three day timespan.

Passes can be purchased by following this link and clicking on Purchase Stickers, Permits, or Certificates. 

For a complete list of Park N' Ski locations, click here and, using the the sidebar tabs, select applicable region.

Free Ski & Snowshoe Day, 2019:

Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation invites you to come explore the mountains with us! Free Ski Day applies to any of our 18 Park N’ Ski Locations

Many of the parks will be hosting additional events and activities, such as free lessons, refreshments, and rental discounts.

Our events calendar has park-specific details and can be found here

 

 

Recreation in Idaho State Parks varies by season. 

 


The Snake River Water Trail

2 States. 1 River. 206 Miles. 

The 206 mile water trail along the Snake River in Southwest Idaho and Eastern Oregon was created to serve the communities along its banks, and in its watershed.  It provides opportunities for people to explore, respect and enjoy our region's natural and cultural heritage. A water trail is a water route that provides recreational and educational opportunities for motorized and non-motorized boaters and commercial opportunities for river communities. Parks, historical sites, trails, towns, counties, recreational retailers, museums, tourism-based organizations, educational agencies, community members and recreationists from Glenn's Ferry to Farewell Bend are all integral parts of our Water Trail.

What is a water trail?

 Water trails are boat routes suitable for canoes, rafts and kayaks as well as recreational motorized watercraft.  Like pedestrian, equestrian and bicycle trails, water trails are corridors connecting recreational destinations.  Water trail amenities include river access sites, boat launches, day-use and fishing areas, and campsites.  In addition to recreation, water trails provide venues for educational experiences about the natural and cultural history, economic development, and community of the regions they traverse.

Water trails vary from short shoreline routes to loops around lakes and lagoons.  They may stretch hundreds of river miles across multiple states, or they may follow ocean coastlines and connect with maritime ports and coastal islands.  Regardless of length or configuration, water trails are valuable assets to cities and counties, providing recreational, educational and economic opportunities for locals and visitors alike.  Water trails help people discover new perspectives about their watersheds and communities, building sense of place and raising awareness of watershed stewardship.  Thriving water trails serve as economic engines for the communities they connect, connecting recreational visitors to opportunities for locally-driven tourism.

Click here to read their blog post!
 

Disc Golf:

(Above - Disc Golf at Eagle Island State Park)

The historic use of "flying discs" has been noted throughout the world, so it is difficult to pin point exactly when and where disc golf started. What we do know, is that in 1976 "Steady" Ed Headrick started the Disc Golf Association and is coined with the popularity of modern disc golf and many frisbee sports. 

Idaho state parks are jumping on the disc golf train and new courses are popping up all over the state.

Check out these parks that host disc golf courses:

Hells Gate State Park near Lewiston, ID
Lake Walcott State Park near Burley, ID 
Farragut State Park near Coeur d' Alene, ID
Massacre Rocks State Park near Pocatello, ID 

 

Snowshoeing: 

Get out and enjoy the crisp winter air!

 

Many of our parks and recreational areas are perfect for snowshoeing! From the tip of the panhandle to the furthest reachest of the southern corners, there are plenty of trails to explore in this nordic wonderland!

 

Snowmobiling:

 

There seemingly endless miles upon miles of trails for snowmobiling in Idaho.

Click here to see an interactive map of where to ride!

 


 

 

 

Recreation in Idaho State Parks varies by season. 

Planning Your Summer Vacation

The nine-month reservation window is now open, meaning you can book stays for up to nine months in advanced. Don't waste your time worrying whether you're going to get a campsite or not--plan ahead and have one ready when you get there. We have tent and RV sites, cabins, houses, and yurts available year-round (weather dependent) so no matter what kind of camper you are--there is a campsite for you.

Reservations can be made toll-free by phone at: 1-888-922-6743 (Agents are available 7 days a week, Monday-Friday from 8:00am - 7:00pm Mountain Standard Time and Saturday & Sunday 9:00am - 5:00pm Mountain Time) or online here.

 

Hiking in Idaho State Parks

Idaho state parks in every region of the state have excellent opportunities for hiking and learning about the natural and historical significance of the environment. Visit these Idaho state parks for exceptional hiking opportunities:
 

Partnerships that support Idaho's recreation and tourism

Created in 1988-1989, IRTI is an enduring coalition of state and federal agencies and non-profit organizations working together to provide Idaho citizens and visitors with statewide recreation opportunities. We work to provide our citizens and visitors with public information, services, and connections to Idaho's best sites and activities. IRTI has supported Idaho's recreation and tourism with these efforts for over 30 years:

  • Statewide campground directory
     
  • Idaho Scenic Byways System
     
  • Guides: Idaho Watchable Wildlife Viewing, Idaho Birding Trails
     
  • Be Outside Idaho, Free Fishing Day, Bird by Bird Idaho, Unplug & Be Outside Days, Bogus Basin Ski, and other youth outdoor activities
     
  • Idaho Department of Commerce & Tourism's "Visit Idaho" travel information
     
  • Trail access and use: motorized, non-motorized, and bikes
     
  • Statewide recreation and tourism conferences, special events, and activities

 

 

Park N' Ski in Idaho

Strap on the skis or snowshoes and enjoy the snow at any of 17 Park N' Ski areas across Idaho. Over 180 miles of groomed and un-groomed trails are marked in some of the most scenic areas in Idaho. 

Revenues from the sale of permits go toward plowing parking lots and improving Nordic ski and snowshoe opportunities. Upon purchasing, skiers and snowshoers can designate which park they would like to have receive their fee. This gives permit purchasers an opportunity to help make improvements to an area of their choice.

Additionally, annual permits are good at Park N' Ski areas in Oregon due to a reciprocity agreement. You must purchase and display your permit in the proper location on your vehicle in order to avoid citations.

The Park N' Ski program is managed primarily by Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, with cooperation and support from U.S. Forest Service, the Idaho Department of Lands, the Idaho Department of Transportation, and many local recreation user groups who provide volunteer trail-enhancement work to make it all possible.

Park N' Ski Locations

There are 17 Park N' Ski locations throughout Idaho. Park N' Ski permits are required November 15 - April 30. Visit the regional links on the left to learn more about access statewide.

 

 
 
Fees
 
Annual Pass: $25
Three-day permit:  $7.50
 
Where does the money go?  Revenues for the sales of these permits go back directly toward trail improvements, plowing parking lots and grooming trails. 

How to Purchase a Permit

Purchase on-line
Purchase at local vendors

 

 

 

Idaho City Backcountry Yurts

>>> Click here to download a trail map that is geo-referenced and both printable and downloadable. The geo-referenced maps work well in a free app called Avenza. With Avenza, you can use your phone's gps tracking without wifi connection.

>>> Click here for instructions on how to download the Avenza app.

Reservations for Backcountry Yurt stays can be made nine-months in advance of your intended stay, toll-free by phone at: 1-888-922-6743 (Agents are available 7 days a week, Monday-Friday from 8:00am - 7:00pm mountain time Saturday & Sunday 9:00am - 5:00pm mountain time) or online.

>>>Click Here for Avalanche Updates

Current Snow Conditions

For updates on grooming status and trail conditions: Call the Idaho City Area Park N’ Ski recorded snowline at 208- 514-2423.

Regional snow conditions, including depth(link is external).

For road conditions, visit the 511 website.

For avalanche reports, visit Avalanche.org


Want to know more about the Backcountry Yurts? Check out The Ultimate Guide from The Mandagie Family and Visit Idaho
Click
here to read the guide!

Includes everything from how to get there, where to park, and what to pack.

Don't forget to read the IDPR Winter Yurt Manual before you go!

**We always recommend a high-clearance, all-wheel drive vehicle when traveling to the yurts.


About the Yurt System

If you really want to get away from it all Idaho City Backcountry Yurts, located about 1.5 hours (56-63 miles) north of Boise, ID, depending on the season choice, they are accessible by hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, Nordic or snowshoeing.  

The video below is recommended viewing for both experienced and first time yurt users. It illustrates the basics of the yurt experience and provides users with tips on how to make your yurt stay more enjoyable.

You can choose from six fabulous backcountry yurts which are accessible year-round.

  • Banner Ridge
  • Elkhorn
  • Skyline
  • Rocky Ridge
  • Stargaze
  • Hennessy 

Each yurt sleeps six people in a comfortably well-furnished atmosphere with high mountain views, no neighbors and access to a wide variety of recreational opportunities including hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, Nordic and Telemark skiing and snowshoeing. In winter, backcountry yurts are accessed by a 2-3 mile ski or snowshoe trek; in summer, a 10-minute to one-mile hike.  Our backcountry yurts have plenty to offer every outdoor enthusiast at any level, whether beginner or experienced.

Elkhorn Yurt

 

Click here or on the image above to view a 360 degree tour of the Elkhorn yurt.

Stargaze Yurt

Click here or on the image above to view a 360 degree tour of the Stargaze yurt.

Current Snow Conditions

For updates on grooming status and trail conditions: Call the Idaho City Area Park N’ Ski recorded snowline at 208- 514-2423.

Regional snow conditions, including depth.

For road conditions, visit the 511 website.

For avalanche reports, visit Avalanche.org

Fees

$115 per night

 

Note: Use fees are per night for a party of up to 6.

Additional per person fees are $12 per person/ per night for a party greater than 6, with a maximum of 9 allowed. 

There is a $10 plus tax non-refundable reservation fee charged at the time of booking.

Cancellation Policy

If a cancellation for a Backcountry Yurt occurs 21 or fewer calendar days prior to arrival, customer forfeits the first night or daily usage fee (base rate).  If the cancellation occurs more than 21 calendar days prior to arrival, a cancellation charge of $10.00 will be assessed. At no time shall the customer be charged a cancellation fee that exceeds the base rate paid for the facility.

Questions? Email the program or call 208-514-2418.

Backcountry Yurt Reservation Forms, Maps & Manuals

Please contact the Idaho City Ranger District at 208-392-3700 to obtain a map and get updates as to which trails are safe to recreate on before you go out and play.

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation Backcountry Yurt Program operates on United States Forest Service Land under agreements with the Boise National Forest.

 

Idaho Snowmobile Program

The Idaho snowmobile program is funded through certificate of number fees purchased by snowmobilers. On November 1 of each year every snowmobile operated on private or public land must be numbered. Certificate of number fees are $32.50 for residents and non-residents and $62.50 for rental machines. Note: non-residents are not exempt from purchasing an Idaho snowmobile certificate of number.

Numbering statistics are available here under the 'planning and statistics' tab. 

Economic Impact

Download the Economic Impact and Importance of Snowmobiling in Idaho.

Designations

To ensure the area you ride has enough funding to operate throughout the season, please designate your certificate of number fees to the county you ride.

How is your certificate of number fee broken down?

  • $1.50 vendor fee
  • $1.00 snowmobile related Search and Rescue efforts
  • 85% goes to the county operated snowmobile grooming programs 
  • Up to 15% goes to administration fees and the printing costs of registration stickers.

What are the certificate of number fees used for?

  • Grooming
  • Parking lot plowing
  • Signing
  • Clearing groomed trails
  • Avalanche classes
  • New rider classes

When does grooming occur?

Grooming happens as weather, snow and safety permit. The below bullets briefly identify when programs groom trails.

  • When safety of the equipment and operators are not a concern.
  • When there is a minimum of 18” of snow in the parking lot.
  • When avalanche conditions do not pose a safety concern for grooming operations.
  • When the grooming temperatures are between -20⁰F and 40⁰F.

 

My Winter Vehicle

What's Required?

Yes No
Yes No


Snowmobile Safety

View or download the "Snowmobiling in Idaho" brochure

Since avalanches are the number one cause of snowmobile fatalities in the west, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is presenting a free snowmobile based Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue clinics near you. These practical and popular classes familiarize the winter backcountry enthusiast with hazard recognition and techniques for safe travel in avalanche terrain.


Winter Updates
Avalanche Warnings, Road Conditions, & Weather Reports


 

Click here for Snowmobile Safety Course or Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue Clinic course registration and information 

These classes are divided into classroom and field exercises and are held regularly during winter months. For information about dates of classes in your region, contact your region coordinator:

Northern Idaho
(208) 769-1511
 
Southeast Idaho
(208) 525-7121
 
Southwest Idaho
(208) 514-2414

5 key safety guidelines when riding in avalanche terrain

  • GET THE GEAR: Ensure everyone has an avalanche transceiver, shovel, and probe on their person and knows how to use them.
  • GET THE TRAINING: Take an avalanche course.
  • GET THE FORECAST: Make a riding plan based on the current avalanche and weather forecast.
  • GET THE PICTURE: If you see recent avalanche activity unstable snow exists. Riding on or underneath slopes is dangerous.
  • GET OUT OF HARM'S WAY: One at a time on all avalanche slopes. Don't go to help your stuck friend. Don’t group up in runout zones.

Avalanche Equipment

Make sure you and the people you ride with carry and know how to use the following avalanche equipment:

  • Avalanche transceiver 
  • Backcountry snow shovel 
  • Avalanche probe 
  • Backpack to keep gear on snowmobiler, not machine

EIGHT STEPS TO REDUCING YOUR AVALANCHE RISK

1.  Get smart! The smart first step is to learn from the avalanche experts. This will take a commitment of time and effort on your part. Divide the task into three parts. First, take an avalanche course. Second, check out the videos on avalanche safety. Third, do some reading and expand on what you have learned. 

2.  Utilize your resources. 

WWW.AVALANCHE.ORG

Sawtooth Avalanche Center (208) 622-8027

Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center  (208) 765-7323

Payette Avalanche Center (208) 634-0409

3.  Identify avalanche terrain. Avalanches run repeatedly year after year in the same areas/slopes called avalanche paths. Avalanches most often start on slopes of 30-45 degrees but sometimes start on slopes as shallow as 25 degrees and as steep as 50 degrees. Knowing the slope angle is “rule number one” in recognizing avalanche terrain, for once slope angles reach 30 degrees, you are in potential avalanche terrain regardless of all other factors.

4.  Read nature’s signs. Sometimes the snow shows clear and present danger signs of avalanche. Some signs are a fresh avalanche, snow collapsing beneath you or creating noticeable cracks. Some weather signs that the hazard could be worsening fast are heavy snowfall -- more than one inch per hour -- or strong winds creating blowing snow and snow plumes off the ridges.

5.  Test the snow. Look for test slopes where you can dig snowpits and perform stress tests. A test slope is a small, steep slope, preferably 30 degrees or steeper, where you will not be in danger of causing an avalanche, but is close to a larger slope that you are concerned about. You can learn all about snowpits while attending Idaho Parks and Recreations Avalanche Awareness course.

6.  Travel smart. There are several rules of safe backcountry travel that will help to minimize your avalanche risk. One at a time.  Only one person at a time should go onto the slope.  Avoid the center. The greatest danger on any steep slope comes when you are in the middle of it.  Stay on shallow slopes. You can always travel on avalanche-free slopes up to 25 degrees. Never ride alone.

7.  Take your pulse. In other words, check your attitude. It can get you in trouble. Are you so goal-oriented to climb this peak or highmark that slope that you are willing to take unwarranted risk? Do not overlook clear and present danger signs! Do not fall into peer pressure! Are you letting haste or fatigue get you in trouble? To prevent accidents from happening, you must control the human factor in your decision-making.  Know your limitations.

8.  Be ready for rescue. There are three parts to the rescue equation that will reduce your risk: what equipment to carry, what to do if you are caught, and what to do if a friend is caught.  

Rescue gear. A snow shovel, probe and a beacon are the items that everyone who goes into the backcountry should not be without. Do not abandon the search or send searchers out for additional help: You are the buried victim’s best chance for survival.

 

Snowmobile safety basics
  • Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. 
  • Always keep to the right on snowmobile trails. 
  • Don't ride alone; two snowmobiles traveling together are much safer than one. 
  • Don't drink alcohol and ride. 
  • Always carry basic emergency and survival equipment (below). 
  • Be familiar with your snowmobile; try short trips and practice in open areas to become thoroughly familiar with its controls and operation before going on extended trips. 
  • Always wear adequate winter clothing and protective glasses, goggles or face shields. Use sun screen to protect your skin from sunburn.

Snowmobile survival kit

  • Avalanche transceiver, probe and shovel
  • Waterproof matches in a waterproof container 
  • Several disposable lighters 
  • Cell phone 
  • Plastic whistle 
  • Map, compass, GPS 
  • Small flashlight with extra batteries 
  • 50 feet of 1/4-inch rope 
  • First aid kit 
  • Space blanket 
  • Candles 
  • High energy food 
  • Signal mirror 
  • Knife 
  • Metal cup 
  • Folding saw 
  • Extra drive belt, spark plugs and tool kit 
  • Tarpaulin or plastic windbreak
 

Snowmobiling is a fun and exciting sport that enables people of all ages to enjoy the outdoors in the winter. Each year in Idaho the sport continues to grow. While snowmobiling is one of the best ways to enjoy Idaho’s backcountry, it can be hazardous if you aren’t prepared.

See all Snowmobiling events

Snowmobiling:

Snowmobiling can be a great choice for winter outdoor recreation. But, as always, ensure that you are prepared! Read more about IDPR snowmobiling here before you hit the hills.

For further education, sign up for one of our Snowmobile Safety Courses. Classes are available across the state. Click here and select Link to Snow Classes. 

Want to find out where to ride?

Join the Idaho State Snowmobiling Association!

Park N' Ski:

There are various locations across the state where you can simply park your car and hit the slopes.

But be aware that you do need a Park N' Ski pass. These can be purchased in two forms--either a three day pass or an annual pass. 

Please note, that there is no one day option, only a three day option. But you are welcome to use the pass as little or as frequently as you choose in that three day timespan.

Passes can be purchased by following this link and clicking on Purchase Stickers, Permits, or Certificates. 

For a complete list of Park N' Ski locations, click here and, using the the sidebar tabs, select applicable region.

Free Ski & Snowshoe Day, 2019:

Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation invites you to come explore the mountains with us! Free Ski Day applies to any of our 18 Park N’ Ski Locations

Many of the parks will be hosting additional events and activities, such as free lessons, refreshments, and rental discounts.

Our events calendar has park-specific details and can be found here

 

 

Recreation in Idaho State Parks varies by season. 

 

The Snake River Water Trail

2 States. 1 River. 206 Miles. 

The 206 mile water trail along the Snake River in Southwest Idaho and Eastern Oregon was created to serve the communities along its banks, and in its watershed.  It provides opportunities for people to explore, respect and enjoy our region's natural and cultural heritage. A water trail is a water route that provides recreational and educational opportunities for motorized and non-motorized boaters and commercial opportunities for river communities. Parks, historical sites, trails, towns, counties, recreational retailers, museums, tourism-based organizations, educational agencies, community members and recreationists from Glenn's Ferry to Farewell Bend are all integral parts of our Water Trail.

What is a water trail?

 Water trails are boat routes suitable for canoes, rafts and kayaks as well as recreational motorized watercraft.  Like pedestrian, equestrian and bicycle trails, water trails are corridors connecting recreational destinations.  Water trail amenities include river access sites, boat launches, day-use and fishing areas, and campsites.  In addition to recreation, water trails provide venues for educational experiences about the natural and cultural history, economic development, and community of the regions they traverse.

Water trails vary from short shoreline routes to loops around lakes and lagoons.  They may stretch hundreds of river miles across multiple states, or they may follow ocean coastlines and connect with maritime ports and coastal islands.  Regardless of length or configuration, water trails are valuable assets to cities and counties, providing recreational, educational and economic opportunities for locals and visitors alike.  Water trails help people discover new perspectives about their watersheds and communities, building sense of place and raising awareness of watershed stewardship.  Thriving water trails serve as economic engines for the communities they connect, connecting recreational visitors to opportunities for locally-driven tourism.

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